2017-08-11 / Travel

Pineville, a frontier village

Part 1: Church
By Warner M. Montgomery


An Episcopal church was constructed in Pineville in 1810. An Episcopal church was constructed in Pineville in 1810. The 1790 census of the St. Stephen Parish (now part of Berkeley County) listed 57 heads of families, 81 free white males age 16 and over, 45 free white males under age 16, 100 free white females, and 2,506 slaves.

Families listed in the census included Galliard, Cordes, Porcher, Canty, Burg, Walters, Perry, Drake, Thomas, Cooper, Guerry, Gourdin, Williams, Palmer, Dubose, Witherspoon, Sinkler, Coutrier, Marion, Hardcastle, Deveaux, Ravenel, and McCleary.

The small village of Pineville was incorporated by the State of South Carolina in 1805 with 22 homes, 150 white citizens, 300 slaves and a few freedmen. The men were farmers; the women tended the home and the children. A few of the farms were large enough to be called “plantations.”

The first order of urgency by the Pinevillians was a church, so they appealed to the bishop in St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Charleston. A chapel was approved in 1810, and the ambitious citizens immediately put their slaves to work building a church with aid from the bishop.


Until automobiles and trucks were available in the 1920s, the people of Pineville rode horses and used wagons pulled by mules. This mule wagon was in use in Pineville during World War II. Until automobiles and trucks were available in the 1920s, the people of Pineville rode horses and used wagons pulled by mules. This mule wagon was in use in Pineville during World War II. Next Week: Pineville School

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