2017-03-17 / Travel

Hezekiah Maham

By Warner M. Montgomery Warner@TheColumbiaStar.com


This monument to Hezekiah Maham was discovered in the Santee River swamp near Pineville. It was erected by Joshua John Ward said to be the most successful rice planter in S.C. and a relative of Maham. This monument to Hezekiah Maham was discovered in the Santee River swamp near Pineville. It was erected by Joshua John Ward said to be the most successful rice planter in S.C. and a relative of Maham. Hezekiah Maham is not mentioned in any popular history book, yet he was a frontiersman, engineer, and Revolutionary War hero. He definitely needs some recognition!

I discovered Maham while exploring my family’s property along the Santee River swamp near Pineville, S.C., with my cousin Keith Gourdin who, years ago, took it upon himself to clear a path to Maham’s burial site and to clean the grave stone’s epitaph which read:

Colonel Hezekiah Maham Within this Cemetery, and in the bosom of the Homestead, which he cultivated and embellished, while on Earth, lie the mortal remains of COLONEL HEZEKIAH MAHAM. He was born in the Parish of St. Stephen, and died A. D., 1789, aet. 50 years; leaving a name unsullied in social and domestic life, and eminent for devotion to the liberties of his country, and for achievements in arms in the Revolution which established her Independence. Impelled by the spirit of freedom which animated his countrymen, he zealously and courageously devoted himself to its support, and promoted the cause of American Independence by his services in the State Committees instituted by recommendation of the General Congress in the Jacksonborough Assembly and in various other civil capacities. Successively: a captain in the first rifle regiment, a commander of horse in Marion’s brigade, and lieutenant colonel of an independent corps of cavalry raised by authority of General Greene, he bore an efficient and conspicuous part in the capture of the British posts, and in the series of skillful maneuvers and gallant actions, which resulted in the final extinction of the British dominion in South Carolina, and secured to her and to the Confederacy the blessings of Peace, Liberty, and Independence. His relative, Joshua John Ward of Waccamaw, unwilling that the last abode of an honest man, a faithful patriot, and a brave and successful soldier, should be forgotten and unknown, has erected this memorial, A. D., 1845.


Keith Gourdin, president of the Col. Hezekiah Maham Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR), points to where he found the Maham monument. Keith Gourdin, president of the Col. Hezekiah Maham Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR), points to where he found the Maham monument. 
This plaque on the Maham monument led me to research the story of Col. Hezekiah Maham. This plaque on the Maham monument led me to research the story of Col. Hezekiah Maham. This information led me on an extensive search of historical records over many years and to write these editions of the life of Col. Hezekiah Maham. Enjoy!

Next Week: Maham’s family

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