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Mike Maddock, General Manager
2012-03-23 / News

Yogursion=Yoga + Girlfriends + Excursion

Photos and story by Pam Clark


(L-r kneeling): Audrey Trujillano, Brenda Reynolds, Brego, Ann Humphries, Marianne Bach-Cohn, Rick Widdifield, Karen Lucas, Kathy Elliott, JoBeth Lewis, and Marian Davis. Standing: Pat Eastman, Pam Clark, and Susan Walker 
Photo by Lisa Smarr (L-r kneeling): Audrey Trujillano, Brenda Reynolds, Brego, Ann Humphries, Marianne Bach-Cohn, Rick Widdifield, Karen Lucas, Kathy Elliott, JoBeth Lewis, and Marian Davis. Standing: Pat Eastman, Pam Clark, and Susan Walker Photo by Lisa Smarr Participants of the Active Adult Adventure Club of Richland County Recreation Commission recently completed their first “Yogursion” trip. Yogursion means, Yoga + Girlfriends + Excursion. This term was penned by Lisa Smarr, the RCRC adult services coordinator. The trip consisted of a drive to the Isle of Palms Marina, a 45 minute ferry ride to the uninhabited Capers Island, a Yoga class on the beach, an exploration of Boneyard Beach, Sullivan’s Island, sightseeing, and dinner.

One must be at least 50 years old to join the AAA Club. Since I finally became of age a year and half ago, the trip really appealed to me. I, along with 11 other women, a seeing eye dog and SC’s best Yoga instructor, Rick Widdifield, boarded a small RCRC bus early Friday morning March 9. Our driver/ coordinator, Lisa Smarr drove us to Isle of Palms Marina. Three of us had never done Yoga before.


Lisa Smarr, RCRC adult services coordinator Lisa Smarr, RCRC adult services coordinator We arrived at the Marina to catch a small ferry that would take us out to Capers Island. The ferry is part of the Barrier Island Eco Tour group, and our captain that day was Griffin Allison. The Isle of Palms Marina was the nicest pier I have ever seen. The bathrooms were exceptionally clean, and they even had hand salt scrubs for visitors.

Our young captain helped to load up the small boat, and we were on our way. The boat sat about 20 some people and was just small enough to guide us through the small canals. The trip to Capers Island was very peaceful; we only saw one small row boat with a man collecting oysters. Bunches of oyster were all along the sides of the canals. We passed one island that had residents, but the only access to them is by a small boat. Our captain told us that if there is a fire, the only way to put it out is if the residents are able to use their garden hose; otherwise, nature is allowed to take its course.


Captain Griffin Allison takes oysters to the group. Captain Griffin Allison takes oysters to the group. We landed on Capers Island about noon. This side of the island was just sand, small dunes, and grass. We did see four or five primitive camp sites. We walked around the bend of the island to find a suitable place for our yoga mats, trying to avoid several jellyfish that had washed up.

The weather was overcast, and the temperture a very comfortable 70 degrees. We all laid out our mats, took our shoes off, and listened to Widdifield. One of our members, Ann Humphries had a hard time getting on her mat. Her guide dog, Brego kept trying to claim it as his.


Beach sculpture decorates Boneyard Beach Beach sculpture decorates Boneyard Beach Our AAA group was guided through yoga for about an hour. I would describe yoga as a very slow moving exercise stretch class that puts the participant in a calm peaceful state of mind. I felt as if the class slept for about a half hour on the beach after our yoga lesson but we were actually awake, relaxed, and in tune with nature all around us.

We ate our bagged lunches and then explored the island. The seashells, beautiful conch, and welk, were everywhere.

After exploring this barren side of Capers Island, our captain loaded us back on the boat and took us to the other side of the approximate four square mile island to Boneyard Beach.

On the way through the small tributaries, our captain stopped the boat and chopped and gathered a few oysters for us. We pulled up to Boneyard Beach about 20 minutes later. The first thing that we noticed on the beach was an eagle on top of a very tall pole. It was awesome to watch our country’s national bird fly so majestically before us.

Boneyard Beach was so different from the other side of the island. It had trees, hardwoods, and palms, not just sand. As we explored around a bend, it felt as if we had walked into an art gallery of huge wooden scupltures. Apparently a storm had blown through many years ago leaving devastation that has aged into a landscape of beautiful driftwood art, hence the name, Boneyard Beach.

Regrettably, our day was getting late, so we headed back to the marina to eat oysters our captain had opened for us. We ended our trip with a bus tour through Sullivan’s Island, then to Boulevard Diner in Mt. Pleasant for a wonderful meal with new friends and memories.

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