2007-12-28 / Travel

It is through asking questions that truth is discovered.

- Mende Proverb
By Lisa Randle RandleL@cofc.edu

This scene (in W. O. Blake, The History of   Slavery and the Slave Trade. 1858) depicts the branding of an enslaved woman by traders after her purchase in Africa.Most traders used iron- forged letters and symbols heated to red hot temperatures. Usually the brands were placed on a person's back or lower neck. This scene (in W. O. Blake, The History of Slavery and the Slave Trade. 1858) depicts the branding of an enslaved woman by traders after her purchase in Africa.Most traders used iron- forged letters and symbols heated to red hot temperatures. Usually the brands were placed on a person's back or lower neck. On February 28- 29, 2008, Savannah will host a symposium of special significance,

The Atlantic

World and African American

Life and Culture in

the Georgia Lowcountry,

18th to the 20th Century.

Sponsoring the event are Savannah State University, Armstrong Atlantic State University, Georgia Southern University, Georgia Historical Society, and the Ossabaw Island Foundation. Partners include the King Tisdale Cottage Foundation and the Coastal Heritage Society.

When speaking of the African American experience in the Lowcountry, most writers begin with a passing nod to the stretch of coast from Georgetown, S.C., to Cumberland Island, Ga., and then focus their attention on South Carolina.

The Georgia coast has been relatively neglected. And yet the experience of African Americans in the Lowcountry, both urban and rural, was an important one, not only for the ways it replicated the traditions, culture, and patterns of its neighbor but possessed its own unique identity. This symposium, featuring 10 of the leading voices in the field, will provide a much- needed forum for new directions and new scholarship on African- American life in the Georgia Lowcountry and its place in the larger Atlantic world. Themes include: • Georgia in the Black Atlantic

• Enslaved Georgia women during the Revolutionary era

• African American religious survivals on the coast

• Muslim presence in the Georgia Lowcountry

• Human relations and family life as reflected in the archaeology of coastal plantations

• Reconstruction on Ossabaw Island

• Community build ing in post- Civil War Savannah

• Sustainability of Gullah- Geechee culture in today's world.

Speakers for the event include:

• Emory Campbell, Penn Center, St. Helena Island

• Erskine Clarke, Columbia Theological Seminary

• David Brion Davis, Yale University

• Allison Dorsey, Swathmore College

• Michael Gomez, New York University

• Jacqueline Jones, Brandeis University • Phillip Morgan, Johns Hopkins University

• Tim Powell, University of Pennsylvania

• Theresa Singleton, Syracuse University

• Betty Wood, Cambridge University

The event will take place at the DeSoto Hilton Hotel. There is a $3 processing fee.

At the reception Wednesday evening, Cornelia Bailey of Hog Hammock will give words of welcome, and the McIntosh County Shouters will perform.

On Thursday night, there is a Lowcountry Boil at the Owens Thomas House.

For further information, contact www.ossabawisland. org or call 912- 233-5104.

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