2006-03-03 / Front Page

Palmetto Cat Club hosts cat show

By Natasha Whitling

Flash, a red and white Persian, won best cat in ring three. His owner, Des Spencer won several ribbons at the 47th Annual Mardi Gras purebred Cat Fancier’s Association’s Cat Show.
Flash, a red and white Persian, won best cat in ring three. His owner, Des Spencer won several ribbons at the 47th Annual Mardi Gras purebred Cat Fancier’s Association’s Cat Show.

Two hundred and twenty–five cats in over 30 breeds arrived with their owners at the Jamil Temple Saturday, February 18. The Palmetto Cat Club hosted the 47th Annual Mardi Gras purebred Cat Fancier’s Association’s Cat Show from 10 am–5 pm.

However, this competition was not just for the blue bloods. Guest judge Jim Gandy of WLTX judged several worthy housecats in a special contest.

The show drew cat lovers from around the country with a variety of breeds from the hairless Sphynx to the decadent Persian.

The categories are broken down into long and short hair and champion or premier. Most cats begin their show careers in the kitten class which is for cats age four to eight months.

Once they reach eight months they can either be placed in the championship class or the premiership class (for those cats that have been neutered or spayed).

Daddy’s Little Girl, an eight month old Sphynx, is owned by Ed Manning of Durham, NC, who says the Sphynx breed is from Canada, not Egypt. This was her first CFAshow. She needs a bath every 10–14 days with a moisturizing shampoo.
Daddy’s Little Girl, an eight month old Sphynx, is owned by Ed Manning of Durham, NC, who says the Sphynx breed is from Canada, not Egypt. This was her first CFAshow. She needs a bath every 10–14 days with a moisturizing shampoo. In order to become a champion or a premier, a cat must have been awarded six winners ribbons in competition.

A total of 200 points are required for a champion to become a grand champion and 75 points for a premier to become a grand premier.

Six judging rings were set up each with its own judge that would observe every cat in a particular category: long, short, or both.

Also, on hand at the show were Carolina Cats and The Sunset Felines, two groups dedicated to the rescue and adoption of cats.


Robyn Browne of Maggie Valley, NC, shows off her chocolate point Siamese, CindyLou’s Tupelo Honey of Teysha, who had just won overall best short–hair kitten. Browne has been breeding Siamese cats for over 20 years.
Robyn Browne of Maggie Valley, NC, shows off her chocolate point Siamese, CindyLou’s Tupelo Honey of Teysha, who had just won overall best short–hair kitten. Browne has been breeding Siamese cats for over 20 years. Photos by Natasha WhitlingCelebrity judge Jim Gandy of WLTX observes Ginger an entrant in the special house cat category. Photos by Natasha WhitlingCelebrity judge Jim Gandy of WLTX observes Ginger an entrant in the special house cat category.

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