2017-03-24 / Travel

Hezekiah Maham

Part 2: Revolution Hero
By Warner M. Montgomery Warner@TheColumbiaStar.com


The Miles Brewton House (ca. 1765), a town house of the colonial period, is one of Charleston’s “double houses.” On the property are a gate house, slave quarters, an arcade, a pavilion, an 18th century formal garden, and columns of the original boat landing that was once in Charleston harbor. The house is listed in the National Register (1966) and is a National Historic Landmark (1960). The Miles Brewton House (ca. 1765), a town house of the colonial period, is one of Charleston’s “double houses.” On the property are a gate house, slave quarters, an arcade, a pavilion, an 18th century formal garden, and columns of the original boat landing that was once in Charleston harbor. The house is listed in the National Register (1966) and is a National Historic Landmark (1960). Hezekiah Maham was born in St. Stephen’s Parish, S.C., in 1739, owned property in the parish in 1771, and died there in 1789 according to historical records. But, who was this man?!

Maham was elected by Charles Town District, St. Stephens Parish, as a member of the First Provincial Congress of South Carolina ( Jan. 11- 17, 1775 & June 1-22, 1775) with Charles Cantey, John Gaillard, Joseph Palmer, Philip Porcher, and Peter Sinkler. They served with the more famous Henry Laurens, Arthur and Henry Middleton, Thomas Hey- ward Jr., Charles Pinckney, Charles C. Pinckney, Thomas Sumter (who would become the Gamecock), Christopher Gadsden, Gabriel Marion (father of Francis Marion of Revolutionary War fame), John and Edward Rutledge, Thomas Lynch, Patrick Calhoun (father of John C. Calhoun, future U.S. vice-president), and Miles Brewton (whose home in Charleston is now a National Historic Landmark).


Henry Laurens, a president of the Continental Congress, served with Hezekiah Maham in the First Provincial Congress. Laurens imported and sold 7,800 Africans (1751- 1761) becoming one of the richest men in British America. Henry Laurens, a president of the Continental Congress, served with Hezekiah Maham in the First Provincial Congress. Laurens imported and sold 7,800 Africans (1751- 1761) becoming one of the richest men in British America. Maham was also elected to the Second Provincial Congress of South Carolina (Nov. 1, 1775–Mar. 26, 1776) from Charles Town District, St. Stephens Parish, with Charles Cantey, John Gaillard, Joseph Palmer, Philip Porcher, and Peter Sinkler.

Continued Next Week



Thomas Sumter, a hero of the American Revolution immortalized in this statue in Sumter, S.C., was called "The Carolina Gamecock” for his fierce fighting tactics. After the war, Sumter ser ved in the U. S. House of Representatives, (1789–1793 & 1797–1801), then in the U. S. Senate (1801-1810). Thomas Sumter, a hero of the American Revolution immortalized in this statue in Sumter, S.C., was called "The Carolina Gamecock” for his fierce fighting tactics. After the war, Sumter ser ved in the U. S. House of Representatives, (1789–1793 & 1797–1801), then in the U. S. Senate (1801-1810).

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